31 July 2015

Threats

Posts relating to the category tag "threats" are listed below.

08 May 2015

Lightning OWASP Project Presentations at AppSec EU 2015

AppSec EU 2015 begins in two weeks. It is being held in Amsterdam at the Amsterdam RAI exhibition and conference centre.

Partial screen capture from the OWASP wiki showing part of the extensive project inventory

With the news yesterday that the number of conference attendee bookings has surpassed 400, together with the training, capture the flag competition, university challenge, application security hackathon, computer gaming, networking and organised social events, it looks like this year's event is shaping up very well.

As well as the project summit, some projects are being discussed in some of the main conference presentations.

When the call for papers was announced last year, I proposed having some sessions that gave the opportunity for a larger number of project leaders to explain their work, the target users, the benefits, and what materials are available. I am pleased to say the conference team liked the idea and allocated two 45-minute slots. These are being used to showcase innovation in OWASP projects to the main conference audience.

Both lightning talk sessions occur on Thursday 21st May. Each talk is 10 minutes long. The speakers and their projects are listed below.

14:30 - 15:15 hrs

  • Spyros GASTERATOS
    Hackademic Challenges, implementing realistic scenarios with known vulnerabilities in a safe, controllable environment.
  • Andrew VAN DER STOCK and Daniel CUTHBERT
    Application Security Verification Standard, providing a basis for assessing web application technical security controls, to establish a level of confidence in the security of web applications.
  • Jonathan CARTER
    Reverse Engineering and Code Modification Prevention, educating security architects, risks analysts, software engineers, and pen testers around binary risks from code integrity violation and reverse engineering.
  • Matteo MEUCCI
    Testing Guide, version 4 the de facto standard for performing web application penetration testing.

15:45 - 16:30 hrs

  • Jim MANICO
    Top 10 Proactive Controls, describing the most important control and control categories that every architect and developer should include in every project, and Cheat Sheet Series, providing a concise collection of high value information on specific web application security topics.
  • Tao SAUVAGE and Marios KOURTESIS
    Offensive Web Testing Framework (OWTF), making security assessments as efficient as possible by automating the manual uncreative part of pen testing, and providing out-of-box support for the OWASP Testing Guide, and NIST and PTES standards.
  • Ann RACUYA-ROBBINS and Luis ENRIQUEZ
    Knowledge Based Authentication Performance Metrics, establishing standard performance metrics for knowledge based authentication (KBA) in alignment the NSTIC guiding principles - at the intersection of security, identity and privacy.
  • Sebastien DELEERSNYDER
    Software Assurance Maturity Model (OpenSAMM), an open framework to help organizations measure, improve and manage their software security practice that is tailored to the specific risks facing the organization.

I will introduce each session, the speakers and keep time. I hope you can join me to hear about these contributions to application security directly from the leaders themselves. We will have time after the sessions for further discussion and questions.

Posted on: 08 May 2015 at 09:00 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

06 May 2015

Android Security 2014

Google announced early last month the release of a report analysing security in the Android ecosystem.

One of the charts from Google's report 'Android Security 2014 Year in Review'

Android Security 2014 Year in Review describes varies measures of security including occurrence of potentially harmful mobile applications, platform API abuse and network level abuse.

Information is provided on Google's 4-tier severity rating systems for vulnerabilities.

Security enhancements during 2014 are also discussed, together with newer changes such as the enhanced Google Play review process to help protect users.

Posted on: 06 May 2015 at 11:27 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

01 May 2015

Snakes & Ladders Coming To Shoreditch

A week on Monday, on the 11th May, I will be speaking during the MAKE day at this year's Digital Shoreditch.

Partial screen capture of the Digital Shoreditch web site at http://digitalshoreditch.com/

The Digital Shoreditch Festival 2015 is a two week mass-community celebration with participants from the world of tech, creative, and all related industries, running from 11th to 24th May. The schedule for the main programme (11th-15th May) has a separate theme for each day — MAKE, GROW, NEXT, CONNECT and LIVE.

The MAKE day offers the chance to learn by doing and bring new ideas to life with with a "vibrant mix of entrepreneurs, artists, scientists, makers, designers and hackers from across the creative ecosystem". I will be talking about the Snakes and Ladders application security board game for developers.

OWASP Snakes and Ladders is a print-your-own board game that is a fun way to learn about the desirable security controls and tricks software applications face. There are two versions — one for web applications and one for mobile apps.

I am speaking at 15:40 hrs in Shoreditch Town Hall. This will be the first time any of the printed sheets for the mobile app board game will be available — previously I have printed and given away the web application board game. Both will be available on Monday.

Otherwise, I am also looking forward to all the other sessions on the day and during the rest of the week. Tickets are on sale.

Hope to see you there.

Posted on: 01 May 2015 at 08:42 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

24 April 2015

AppSensor CISO Briefing

Following the release of the Introduction for Developers in February, the OWASP AppSensor team has now created and published a new document aimed at Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and others with similar responsibilities.

Cover of the 'AppSensor CISO Briefing'

The CISO Briefing is a high-level overview, with pointers to the more detailed resources for specifiers, architects, developers and operators.

The document's content was partially taken from the introductory sections of the AppSensor Guide and the AppSensor Microsite. This was then edited and changed by myself, John Melton and Louis Nadeau.

I incorporated several quotations from industry analysts, reports and standards to help set the context in the current security environment. The quotations are all publicly available but are mostly not OWASP AppSensor specific — instead they illustrate current trends and concerns about attack visibility, real-time detection, the need for automation, runtime application self-protection (RASP), and active defences.

The 12 pages comprise the following:

  • Defending Software Applications
  • Detect and Respond to Attacks From Within the Application
  • Benefits For Organizations and Users
    • Lower information security risk
    • Improved compliance
    • Reduced impact of attacks and breaches
    • Increased system survivability
  • Enterprise Ready
    • Extremely low false positives
    • Intelligence driven security
    • Low system resource overhead
    • Machine-speed response
  • Next Steps
  • Additional AppSensor Resources
  • About OWASP.

The CISO Briefing can be downloaded free of charge as a PDF, or purchased at cost in hardcopy from Lulu.com. There will also be some copies available during the CISO track at the AppSec EU conference in May.

Posted on: 24 April 2015 at 08:54 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

21 April 2015

Data Breach Investigations Report 2015

The Verizon annual Data Breach Investigations Report was published last week.

Partial view of Figure 43 from the Verizon 'Data Breach Investigation Report' showing the SANS critical security controls mapped to incident event chains

The Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) summarises findings from the collection and analysis of almost 80,000 security incidents relating to over 2,000 confirmed data breaches, sourced from 70 contributing organisations.

A breakdown by industry sector is provided. The 2015 DBIR incident and breach information collection processes have no substantial changes from the 2014 DBIR, focusing on security events resulting in confirmed data disclosure, as well as other security incidents such as denial-of-service attacks, and compromises of systems without data loss. The report re-iterates that it only represents a sample of events — the results are only representative of the sources of information contributed.

An analysis of the threat actions illustrates that the proportion of actions involving RAM scraping is growing, spyware/keylogger is falling and both credentials and phishing are broadly similar.

There is plenty of interesting data on breach discovery, phishing, patching, malware, industry profiles and impacts. The discussions on the problems with threat intelligence and the limited impact of mobile device compromise are insightful.

Nine common incident classification patterns are used to summarise the findings, including "web application attacks", accounting for 9.4% of incidents. Almost all the attacks in this category were opportunistic in nature, with information, financial services, and public entities being particularly affected. Use of stolen credentials are the most common action involved.

The last figure in the report (illustrated above) is a mapping from the recommended SANS Critical Security Controls to incident event chains. Although this only relates to Verizon's own source data, and not any of the other contributors, it illustrates that many basic security measures can help protect against the most common attacks. These include two-factor authentication, patching web services, verifying the need for internet-facing devices, proxying outbound traffic and web application testing.

Posted on: 21 April 2015 at 10:49 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

16 April 2015

PCI DSS v3.1 for Ecommerce Payments

Lots happening this week. The Payment Card Industry Security Standard Council (PCI SSC) has announced the release of an update to the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS).

Partial view of the title sheet from the Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard, Requirements and Security Assessment Procedures, Version 3.1, April 2015

PCI DSS v3.1 (15 April 2015), includes several changes to reflect changing threats and recently discovered vulnerabilities, but also including some clarifications and additional guidance.

The most important aspects changed for ecommerce channels relate to the following PCI DSS requirements:

  • 2.2.3 and 4.1 - Removed SSL as an example of a secure technology. Added note that SSL and early TLS are no longer considered to be strong cryptography and cannot be used as a security control after June 30, 2016. Additional guidance provided in Guidance column. Also impacts Requirements 2.3 and 4.1.
  • 2.3 and 4.1.1 - Removed SSL as an example of a secure technology and added a note to the requirement.
  • 3.4 - Clarified in requirement note that additional controls are required if hashed and truncated versions of the same PAN are present in an environment.
  • 6.6 - Added clarification to testing procedure and Guidance column that if an automated technical solution is configured to alert (rather than block) web-based attacks, there must also be a process to ensure timely response.

The PCI SSC has provided an on demand webinar to assist with understanding all the changes. Version 3.1 is effective immediately and PCI DSS Version 3.0 will be retired on 30 June 2015.

Posted on: 16 April 2015 at 11:38 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

15 April 2015

Security of Public Communications Network and Service Providers

The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) has published guidance on what nations should take into account when evaluating the security compliance of public communications network and service providers.

Bars on a chart from the ENISA document 'Technical Guideline on Security Measures for Article 4 and Article 13a'

The requirements relate to Article 13a of the Framework Directive (2009/140/EC) and Article 4 of the e-Privacy Directive (2002/58/EC).

At first glance, many organisations might assume they do not fall within the remit of this "network and services" legislation, but Technical Guideline on Security Measures for Article 4 and Article 13a describes the "assets in scope" as "all assets of the provider which, when breached and/or failing, can have a negative impact on the security of networks, services and/or the processing of personal data".

The guidance provides a non-exhaustive list of networks and services, and related systems "which are often supporting, directly or indirectly, the provision of networks and services or the personal data processing". Whilst many in scope systems are communication and network related, including wires and fibre, network devices and DNS, other components mentioned are PCs, removable media, power supply systems, backup power supply and cooling systems. Many companies may be providers of services like these to organisations that are affected by the legislation.

The document goes on to describe "additional services" in scope that include "Provider web sites for customers, billing portals, et cetera, if they contain personal data which was collected and processed in connection with the provision of networks or services", "Customer premises equipment (CPE), if under the control of the operator (such as VOIP boxes)" and "Other systems used for storing or processing of personal data collected in connection with the provision of networks or services. This could involve procedures involving paperwork like paper-printed letters, contracts or bills". As the document states "Third party assets are in scope just as if they were assets of the provider".

The guidance defines a "security incident" as "a single or a series of unwanted or unexpected events which could have an impact on the security of networks, services and/or the processing of personal data". It goes on to provide examples of various scales of incident and whether they are reportable.

The technical guidance is divided into 26 security objectives, each with three levels of sophistication that demonstrates what level of controls are in place. The objectives and measures might be useful for other organisations to assess their own maturity, regardless of legislative applicability.

Posted on: 15 April 2015 at 18:18 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

07 April 2015

Penetration Testing Guidance for PCI DSS

The Payment Card Industry (PCI) Security Standards Council (PCI SSC) has published another information supplement for PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), this time on penetration testing. It would appear there has been a large variability in penetration tests being undertaken for PCI DSS.

The cover from the PCI Security Standard's Council  'Information Supplement: Penetration Testing Guidance'

Information Supplement: Penetration Testing Guidance, v1 March 2015, replaces the PCI SSC's original penetration testing information supplement titled "Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) Requirement 11.3 Penetration Testing" published in 2008.

The scope of a penetration test is defined in PCI DSS Requirement 11.3. It must include the entire cardholder data environment (CDE) perimeter and any critical systems that may impact the security of the CDE, as well as the environment in scope for PCI DSS. This includes both the external perimeter (public-facing attack surfaces) and the internal perimeter of the CDE (LAN-LAN attack surfaces).

The information supplement is comprised of the following sections:

  • Introduction
  • Penetration testing components: Understanding of the different components that make up a penetration test and how this differs from a vulnerability scan including scope, application and network- layer testing, segmentation checks, and social engineering
  • Qualifications of a penetration tester: Determining the qualifications of a penetration tester, whether internal or external, through their past experience and certifications.
  • Methodology: Detailed information related to the three primary parts of a penetration test: pre-engagement, engagement, and post-engagement
  • Reporting and documentation: Guidance for developing a comprehensive penetration test report that includes the necessary information to document the test as well as a checklist that can be used by the organization or the assessor to verify whether the necessary content is included
  • Case studies / scoping examples.

Hopefully this will help organisations define more consistent objectives and requirements for penetration tests, improving the quality, and thus benefits of doing such testing.

Posted on: 07 April 2015 at 06:39 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

27 March 2015

Financial Conduct Authority Update March 2015

The UK's Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is becoming more proactive in the online application space.

Photograph of one of the dragon boundary marks at the boundary of the City of London on Embankment

Following last year's consultation on use of social media, the FCA has completed its review and has now confirmed its approach for financial promotions in social media.

The finalised guidance has been published as FG15/4 - Social Media and Customer Communications: The FCA's Supervisory Approach to Financial Promotions in Social Media.

This covers web sites and applications that enable users to create and share content or participate in social networking, including blogs, microblogs (e.g. Twitter), social and professional networks (e.g. Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+), forums, and image and video-sharing platforms (e.g. YouTube, Instagram, Vine, Pinterest. Any form of communication (including through social media) is capable of being a financial promotion, depending on whether it includes an invitation or inducement to engage in financial activity. So, for example, it would include 'advergames', where promotional messages are placed in entertainment applications.

On another matter, in addition to the document published in July on Considerations for Firms Thinking of Using Third-Party Technology (off-the-shelf) Banking Solutions, legal news blog Out-law.com reports the FCA is examining platforms' technology systems later this year.

The FCA is also consulting on proposed changes to its consumer credit rules and guidance. Almost a year ago on 1st April 2014 the FCA took over the regulation of consumer credit from the former Office of Fair Trading (OFT). This brought around 50,000 consumer credit firms into its scope.

And finally, the UK's new Payment Systems Regulator (PSR), launching next week and part of the FCA, has announced its regulatory framework for payment systems (summary factsheet). Customers of payment services providers may not be aware of this change — Card payment systems is in the 2015/16 programme of work.

Keep up-to-date with FCA and PSR news.

Posted on: 27 March 2015 at 08:40 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

24 March 2015

Web Application Attacks from a WAF Perspective

I had lost track of Imperva's useful Hacker Intelligence Initiative (HII), threat advisories and Web Application Attack Reports (WAARs). The latest WAAR was published in October 2014.

Part of Imperva's 'Web Application Attack Report Edition #5 - October 2014' illustrating two of the charts included

Web Application Attack Report Edition #5 - October 2014 describes the most popular web application targets, attack vectors, duration and magnitude. The analysis is based on data from 99 web applications that had a web application firewall (WAF) from the vendor deployed in the period 1st August 2013 to 30th April 2014.

Attack data are included for:

  • SQL injection
  • Remote file inclusion
  • Local file inclusion
  • Directory traversal
  • Cross-site scripting
  • Comment spamming.

Other types of attack vector and threats are not covered. The report's introduction suggests that a further 201 web applications did not see any of these types of attack during the period.

Posted on: 24 March 2015 at 08:32 hrs

Comments Comments (0) | Permalink | Send Send | Post to Twitter

More Entries

Threats : Application Security and Privacy
ISO/IEC 18004:2006 QR code for https://clerkendweller.uk

Requested by 54.144.68.27 on Friday, 4 September 2015 at 15:26 hrs (London date/time)

Please read our terms of use and obtain professional advice before undertaking any actions based on the opinions, suggestions and generic guidance presented here. Your organisation's situation will be unique and all practices and controls need to be assessed with consideration of your own business context.

Terms of use https://www.clerkendweller.uk/page/terms
Privacy statement https://www.clerkendweller.uk/page/privacy
© 2008-2015 clerkendweller.uk